1. 10:54 21st Aug 2014

    Notes: 1394

    Reblogged from msaether

    Tags: cap2mcu

    People will fight for their freedom if people try to take it from them.

    (Source: clintkates)

     
  2. 10:49

    Notes: 1645

    Reblogged from allisonsisaac

    Tags: the vampire diaries

    That’s it. That’s the show. (x)

    (Source: klaussified)

     
  3. 10:48

    Notes: 602

    Reblogged from halesfire

    Tags: tw

    teen wolf + symmetry (part one)

     
  4. 10:46

    Notes: 22169

    Reblogged from devilsdouble

    Tags: mcu

    it’s what we call ourselves — sort of like a team. earth’s mightiest heroes type thing.

    (Source: ackermanlevi)

     
  5. 10:14

    Notes: 32078

    Reblogged from cumbaebatch

    Tags: net neutrality

    image: Download

    thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

    thehpalliance:

    If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

    You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

    This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

    Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

    Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

    Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

    It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

    If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

    Sign the petition, then spread the word.

     
  6. 10:13

    Notes: 3342

    Reblogged from mmmcoconut

    Tags: music

    Plays: 35,103

    I Love You // Woodkid feat. Angel Haze

    (Source: musicsoundsbetterblog)

     
  7. 09:51

    Notes: 154

    Reblogged from maybejustcreation

    Tags: raleigh becketpacific rim

    Mako. What was all that about? I mean, I’m not crazy. You felt it, right? We are drift compatible.

     
  8. 09:49

    Notes: 3899

    Reblogged from devilsdouble

    Tags: twallison argent

    Nous protégeons ceux qui ne peuvent pas se protéger eux-mêmes.

    (Source: stydiar)

     
  9. 09:49

    Notes: 882

    Reblogged from ewparrish

    Tags: derek haletw

    athosds:

I want to feel the pain and the bitter taste, of the blood on my lips, again.

    athosds:

    I want to feel the pain and the bitter taste, of the blood on my lips, again.

     
  10. 09:49

    Notes: 824

    Reblogged from nawbabe

    Tags: ferguson

    thepoliticalfreakshow:

    Protesters after the midnight curfew in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 17, 2014. Lucas Jackson / Reuters

    WASHINGTON — Amnesty International has taken “unprecedented” action to deal with the situation in Ferguson, Missouri, by sending resources the human rights group has never deployed inside the United States.

    The organization has been on the ground in Ferguson since Thursday, sending a 13-person human rights delegation to the city in the wake of the Aug. 9 police shooting death of Michael Brown.

    Jasmine Heiss, a senior campaigner with Amnesty who is a part of the team in Ferguson, said the use of the “cross-functional team” — which she said included community trainers, researchers, and human rights observers — was “unprecedented” within the United States for the group.

    On Saturday, after Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and put a curfew in place in Ferguson, Amnesty International USA’s executive director, Steven W. Hawkins, issued a scathing statement.

    “We criticize dictators for quelling dissent and silencing protestors with tactics like curfews, we’ll certainly speak out when it’s happening in our own backyard,” he said. “The people of Ferguson have the right to protest peacefully the lack of accountability for Michael Brown’s shooting.”

    image

    Amnesty on the scene, wearing yellow “Observer” t-shirts. #Ferguson

    In an interview Sunday afternoon, Heiss said because of limits police placed on Amnesty’s access, “It was very difficult to see anything once the curfew went into effect last night.”

    It was “impossible,” she said, for Amnesty to make any sort of judgment about whether actions taken by the police after the midnight curfew went into effect were proportional or necessary. She called it emblematic of “the overall lack of transparency in this investigation.”

    Heiss noted the group’s long focus on criminal justice, including the use of excessive force, in the United States. The group’s “Rights For All” effort in 1998, which included follow-up proposals for change in 1999, preceded specific investigations into the Los Angeles and Chicago police operations.

    In terms of specific cases, she noted that the group called for similar action by officials after the killing of Trayvon Martin in Florida. The group there, she said, had there called for a “thorough, impartial, swift investigation — with transparency,” emphasizing that a key tenet of that is “the family is kept informed” about the investigation.

    On Sunday, after the team examined the situation in Ferguson, Amnesty International USA released three recommendations going forward:

    • A prompt, thorough, independent and impartial investigation into the shooting of Michael Brown. Brown’s family must be kept informed throughout the investigation. Under international law, police officers suspected of having committed unlawful acts must be held to account through effective investigation, and where warranted, prosecuted.

    • All police departments involved in policing the ongoing protests in Ferguson in response to Michael Brown’s death must act in accordance with international human rights standards. Any human rights abuses in connection with the policing of protests must be independently and impartially investigated, and those responsible held accountable.

    • A thorough review of all trainings, policies and procedures with regards to the use of force and the policing of protests should be undertaken.

    Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News